Alternative medicine

How to Define Value in the Pilates Business

Value.png

How to Define Value in the Pilates Business

Are your clients happy to pay you? Are you making enough money to meet your needs and wants? What is your "Wow" factor?

I am active in many Facebook groups devoted to Pilates and Fitness teaching and marketing. At least once a month someone asks about what successful teachers, trainers, or owners add to their businesses to make them more valuable in the eyes of potential clients and customers.

My answer is always the same.

You must be the Wow factor of your Pilates business. You must be the value!

This answer seems to bother people. I have been told that I am "ripping people off" by charging a lot for my services. I have been told that there is no way people would gladly pay that much for Pilates unless there is a bunch of stuff added to the offerings.

Other trainers and teachers always ask me what else I offer.

Surely there must be extra groups, emails, meetings? Surely I must offer gifts, bonuses, and other add-ons?

Nope!

I offer me.

And I spend time focusing on how I can make a better me, since I am the value that I offer to my clients.

You see, it is the client who defines value. Let me repeat, it is the client who defines value!

So I spend my money and time on taking great Pilates sessions, on learning from people who know at least as much, if not much more, than I do. I also spend time and money adding to my toolbox - kettlebells and TRX for more resistance training? I got that. Some simple neuroscience based MindMAP coaching? I can do that. Some Reiki to keep you calm and feeling better? No problem!

From my end I promise to be on time, to be responsible, to never harm anyone, and to continually strive to help my clients feel, function, and live better.

Not only do my clients feel, function, and live better, they are happy to pay for their sessions. Not once has anyone looked at me and said, "So Lynda, what else can you give me for this money?"

Not once!

Getting back to your situation, what is your client response? If they bargain, hem and haw, and otherwise show reluctance to pay for your services, that means they are not perceiving value.

That doesn't mean that you and your skills aren't valuable. But it does mean that your clients aren't seeing it.

How to define your value?

Look at things and services in your life where you are willing to pay more money. Better hotels, leather goods, wines, massage therapists, facials? Better medical care, grocery selection, dinner service?

Where you are willing to pay more? What differentiates that experience? What makes it better and more valuable, even though it is more expensive?

Now, apply that definition to yourself and your Pilates business.

Reiki In Hospitals

Over a decade ago I had a total abdominal hysterectomy and had to literally jump through hoops to get some energy healing in pre-op and recovery. That was how my surgeon learned about the effects of this work (in my case less pain, less blood loss, and quicker recovery).

Her training as a registered dietitian and master’s level health-care administrator left Cathy Keith with little regard for complementary medicines and therapies such as Reiki.

“I was definitely thinking this was all out on the fringe and kind of woo-woo, foo-foo,” Keith said.

Now, she makes Reiki — a therapy using a light touch or hands placed near a patient’s body to assist the idea that energy as a universal life force can be channeled for healing — and a half-dozen other mind-body services available to patients as manager of SwedishAmerican Hospital’s Holistic Health Services.

Keith changed her mind about complementary therapies when she heard what patients said after they had received the treatments.

Like my own experience, most patients report feeling better, feeling calmer, sleeping better, and having less side effects from medications.

Sandy Farnham, a practitioner who performs treatments in hospitals and hospice situations, said she can sometimes feel heat in an area and feel it dissipate as she works. “I work at least 20 hours a week in hospitals,” Farnham said. “And when they are hooked up to the monitors, you can see the blood pressure go down, you can see the heart rate go down. You can see them relax.”

Hopefully this is a sign that Reiki and other energy healing therapies that are useful to patients will continue to be used and accepted in our Western medical model.