Fitness Marketing

When FitPro Email Marketing Fails

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When FitPro Email Marketing Fails the results can be very funny, but bad for business.

This morning I received an email from someone representing a new app to help Fitness Professionals. Too bad the email was completely off.

This iOS app may be awesome for FitPros who are having a hard time tracking their clients. It is inexpensive and sounds robust, which is why I left a live link in this post. For a crazy busy trainer with too much too keep track of, this app may be the perfect solution.

But even if I used iOS, this email would have been enough to turn me off. Welcome to When FitPro Email Marketing Fails.

1. The Email

Hello Lippin,

I came across your profile at ideafit.com and found your website http://www.lyndalippin.com. I see that you are an experienced fitness professional.

For over a year, I and my team have been developing 52C -- a new online tool for Personal Trainers. Many great PTs like yourself have advised us and helped us make it a real time saver when it comes to collecting clients' progress data and planning workout sessions.

Now the app is ready: 52challenges.com

Would you like to test it out free for 14 days?

-- Best regards, xxx Patxxx, Content Manager

2. My Reply

Hi Patxxx,

I am somewhat confused by this email.

First, you address me as “Lippin”. which is why I addressed you as “Patxxx”. I assume last name only is how things go at 52challenges? Very military-like of you.

Second, if you looked at my website and my ideafit profile, you would see that I have no problems tracking clients. I am organized, have a great memory, and as a former philosophy professor I have a wonderful attention to detail.

Third, while your email sounds like you are making me a special 14 day free offer, I notice when I click the link that the 14 day trial is open to any fitness pro. So why bother emailing me directly and making this sound like a special offer?

I am not interested, and couldn’t even use your app as it is only for iOS and I don’t use apple portable devices.

So, thank you for giving me a laugh this morning and some fodder for my next blog post - FitPro Marketing Email Fail.

Best,

LL

3. The Marketing Lessons

The takeaway for marketers is pretty clear and starts with the basics of proofreading your form email before hitting send, and knowing your audience.

Presentation alone can turn a potential customer away. I can't say this often enough - make sure you take the time to proofread and edit.

You have one shot at this opening email. Make it a great one!

How Big Is Your Pilates Niche?

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The size of your Pilates Niche (or Fitness, Yoga, Travel...) is less important than how you serve them.

I woke up this morning to a timely e-mail from one of my marketing gurus, Seth Godin. Today's post is titled, "Is Your Niche Too Small?"

There's no such thing as a niche that's too small if the people care enough.

If you think you need a bigger market, you're actually saying that the market you already have doesn't need you/depend on you/talk about you enough.

You might not need a bigger niche. You might only need to produce more value for those you already serve.

How does this apply to your business?

Well, I will use myself as an example. My niche is people aged 35-65 who are affluent, lead stressful lives, and experience pain and/or dysfunction. I work with hedge fund managers with back pain and bad posture, women with diastasis after having children, and high powered attorneys with scoliosis who need to be as functional as possible.

Because I charge a lot, my clientele is limited to those who can afford me. And since that means they can afford just about anyone, what kind of value do I offer to my niche that keeps them doing Pilates with me?

  1. I am consistently on time and ready to work with my client.
  2. I maintain focus on my client during the entire session, starting with, "How is your body today? How can I help you today?" and ending with, "Happy to help."
  3. I watch my clients move all hour, checking and correcting position so that he or she gets the most benefit from the exercises.
  4. I answer questions and explain why I am doing things a certain way, or in a certain order.
  5. I am more than happy to discuss what I am doing with medical professionals, so everyone can be comfortable and on the same page.
  6. I offer consistent and verifiable results! Less pain, better posture, smaller diastasis and hernia.
  7. Simply put, my clients FEEL BETTER and do better in life.

And really, if you can afford to, who wouldn't pay for that?

Do you serve your Pilates niche this way?

Would you?

Marketing 101 for Trainers Part 1 - April 30, 2014

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Marketing 101 for Trainers is a 3-part workshop series led by Lynda Lippin that will teach you how to increase your value in a very crowded fitness marketplace.

The pilates and fitness market has enjoyed unprecedented growth over the past decade, which is a wonderful thing!
But now, as trainers, we are facing more competition within our industry. And with clearer certification pathways, there are more certified trainers on the market now than ever.
  • How can you distinguish yourself in this crowded marketplace?
  • How can you make more money, increase your quality client base, and shine in your field?
  • Have you dreamed about working overseas?
  • Wonder what skill set you need to have to land a great job inside or outside of the US?
  • And finally, have you ever wondered how to attract and maintain steady, standing, high income clients?

Learn how in this 3 part Workshop series, where each month at Real Pilates Lynda will take on an important aspect of business and marketing for personal trainers and pilates teachers.

If this is your first time visiting Real Pilates, use code LLGIFT at checkout and you will receive a lovely welcome gift when you check in!

Episode 1 - Teaching Out of Your Comfort Zone
Wednesday, April 30, 3:00 – 4:30pm
There is a lot of call for trainers who will travel. This travel can be domestic or international, and includes subbing in other studios or in hotels/resorts, making outcalls of any kind (to hotels, private homes, or to train ann entire family), picking up traveling clients or short-term residents, and traveling with a client.  We will also discuss how to find overseas positions, including issues regarding work visas, relocation, temp work, and the dangers of “working fitness vacations”.

Fitness Marketing - Compassion or Judgement?

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Fitness Marketing as it stands is based on judgement. What would Fitness Marketing based on compassion look like?

Like many fitness professionals, I am a member of many groups on Facebook. The most useful this far has been Dax Moy's Fitness Marketing Made Simple.

Recently Dax has been putting out challenges for the members of the group. I haven't really been active lately after dealing with both parents dying in a five week span, as well a major injury, but today I was completely inspired by one of Dax's posts.

At some point in the (hopefully) not too distant future, this industry of ours has to grow up and start looking at people through the eyes of compassion rather than judgement.

At some point, this industry has to stop vilifying people who carry fat and making their lives ABOUT becoming thin and instead help people to become happy.

We would all like to think that thin = happy. But in reality, happiness has little to do with your size. I have been a miserable anorexic thin person, and a happier bigger person. My size tends to have little impact on how I feel, except when others judge me because of my size.

I have gained 20 pounds in the last four months. Some days, the only food I can stomach is comfort food. My parents always struggled with weight, so my comfort food is distinctly not healthy. But sometimes my psychological comfort is primary.

It seems ridiculous to me that in the 21st century we can't see that fat gain only makes people unhappy because of the judgement of others. Because of the stories we tell ourselves (because we've heard them from others) are those that say that because someone has more fat than someone else, they are somehow less worthy of happiness in their lives.

Even at my smallest, I am a curvy woman. As a personal trainer and pilates teacher, I have had people judge me immediately. Seriously, one troll on YouTube commented, "Why the fuck would I want to workout with a fat person?" And that is on a video where I am pretty slim!

At some point this industry of ours needs to remember that people aren't fat, they HAVE fat and that fat, just like muscle or bone, can be built up or broken down.

At some point, we need to make the goal of exercise, activity and eating clean about helping people to remember that regardless of weight, size, circumference or bodyfat percentage, their lives have meaning and value.

Of course, part of the problem is/was that I still feel/felt compelled to market based on ability to produce weight loss, fat loss, and tone in my clients. And in general, I am quite good at doing that for other people.

But in reality, my client focus is always on making my clients feel great. If you look at my client testimonials, most of them are about how my clients feel when they work with me. Better, stronger, less pain.

One thing's for sure...

That way we're doing it now isn't working for many.

So at some point we need to stop congratulating ourselves on perpetuating the myth of fatloss and start helping people remember their own value.

And that's all I got to say about that (in my best Forrest Gump Voice).

Moving forward, I will be compassionate with myself. I will love my body as it is, and appreciate how much better it feels and moves as I do more with my body and get stronger.

More importantly, I will approach my clients, readers, and everyone with the same compassion.

Let's get healthy, people! Let's feel better.

Looking better ain't all there is.