weights

Why I Love My GRIPBELLs

GRIPBELLs are a dumbbell, kettlebell, and weighted bar all in one!

When the folks at GRIPBELLs contacted me to try their new product free to review, I really wasn't sure. I receive requests to review products all the time, and generally at this point I say NO. Why? Because I have little time, little storage space, and tend to be happiest with my old school kettlebells and dumbbells.

Then I showed them to hubby, who thought that they looked great, and could be a good addition to our home fitness gear. He has had shoulder surgery, and prefers to work both arms at once, but we have no space for traditional weighted bars.

About a week or two later, I received two - 8# and 12#. The GRIPBELL comes in five weights - 3#, 5#, 8#, 10#, and 12#. You can order them singly and in pairs, and the whole set or just the heavier ones singly or in pairs.

While the weights are lighter than, say, a standard pood kettlebell, note that the GRIPBELL allows some larger mobility movements do the the shape of the weight. Each GRIPBELL is the same size, similar to competition-style kettlebells.

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Why I Love the GRIPBELL

First, we live in a studio apartment, so storage is key. The GRIPBELLs store flat and stacked, or on their sides. And since one of these replaces a kettlebell and dumbbell, they take up much less room!

Second, I love being able to alter my grip placement based on either comfort or what muscles I am working. Hubby and I often use different grips for the same exercise, since he is wider with larger hands. 

Third, due to the width and shape of the GRIPBELL, it is easy to do larger, sweeping, full body movements comfortably. Great if you are a trainer working with athletes or dancers, and if you are an athlete or dancer! Here is a great video with some demonstrations:

As you can see, the GRIPBELL is an extremely useful and user-friendly tool.

GRIPBELL founder Mark Wood started his fitness journey with kettlebells, until he lost his grip on the metal handle (sweating does that) and ended up with a knee injury. This is when the GRIPBELL was born with no exposed metal, consistent sizing, and a good grip with multiple hand points.

While not cheap at approximately $50 per single GRIPBELL, they are so useful and well made that they are worth every penny. Go and pre-order your GRIPBELLs today!

Why Women Should Think About Lifting Weights

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Why women should think about lifting weights

(a sponsored post)

Lifting weights can often fell like a male dominated activity. We still tend to associate the weight area of a gym with the large bodybuilders who are trying to bulk up and get as muscly as possible. But what about for the average woman – should we all be hitting the weights?

Weight lifting can be daunting and women often ignore it as part of their exercise regime. You always hear stories like, ‘lifting makes women bulky,’ or ‘it’s bad for your joints.’ The reality is these are all silly stereotypes that are keeping too many women from experiencing the profound benefits of resistance training.

When you sit down to list your fitness objectives, you may be surprised to learn that that strength training will not only help you reach them, but may reach them faster than performing cardio exercise alone. There are plenty of fitness blogs out there that will all talk about the benefits of lifting weights. Sites like Fitness Drum who use personal trainers to offer insights and advice all discuss the importance of lifting weights for anyone looking to get healthier.

Cardio workouts will always form the foundation of any fitness plan however lifting weights is the perfect way to progress and help you become fitter and healthier.

Although many people consider weightlifting only a means to add size, when contrasted head-to-head against cardiovascular exercise, resistance training comes out on top in the battle to burn calories. A HIIT programme combining some type of weight lifting will really help you burn calories.

There is also some added advantages to lifting weights. After a session of strength training, you continue to consume additional oxygen in the hours and even days that follow. This is known as excess post-exercise oxygen consumption. When your body uses more oxygen, it requires more caloric expenditure and an increased metabolic rate. In essence, your body is still working hard when you’re not exercising.

Lifting weights will also help in everyday life. Being that little bit stronger will make those daily tasks seem so much easier. Carrying those shopping bags no longer has to be a struggle. Opening that jar of sauce no longer has to be a struggle.

Strength training greatly improves sleep quality, aiding in your ability to fall asleep faster, sleep deeper, and wake less often during the night. A study published in the International SportMed Journal suggests that morning resistance training or high intensity training greatly affects the quality of sleep and lengthens the time of sleep the night after training. Strength training is also strongly associated with improved heart disease.

To get these kind of benefits you don’t need to be lifting really heavy weight every day. Any personal trainer or fitness instructor can design a program that will help you achieve these benefits. Start off just lifting very light weights once a week and slowly progress at your own pace – you’ll be amazed at what you can achieve!